Home Ahead of print Instructions Contacts
About us Current issue Submit article Advertise  
Editorial board Archives Subscribe Login   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 135-140

Influence of cardiovascular risk factors on cochlear dysfunction


1 Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
2 Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
3 ENT Clinic, Clinical and Hospital Centre Zvezdara, Faculty for Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
4 Clinic for Neurology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nemanja Radivojevic
Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade
Serbia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/indianjotol.INDIANJOTOL_127_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Cochlear dysfunction can arise not only from various factors such as ear diseases but also from systemic disorders of the body. The occurrence of otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, dizziness, and tinnitus can be due to cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, current understandings in the field of the diagnosis and therapy of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) should include, among others, evidence of otologic disorders. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the association between risk factors for CVD and cochlear dysfunction. Methods: The cross-sectional study included 128 participants with major CVD risk factors who underwent auditory function examination (pure tone audiometry). Results: There were 52 women (40.6%) and 76 men (59.4%) in total. The mean age of the participants was 58 years (a range of 28–83 years). The mean age among participants with hearing loss was 60 (±10.88), whereas the mean age among participants that had normal hearing thresholds was 54 (±12.18). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was measured in 59% of participants, of most frequent mild degree hearing loss. The prevalence of SNHL was higher in participants with arterial hypertension (P < 0.001, OR = 5.881, 95% CI 2.694–12.837) and the most common among them was moderate degree hearing impairment (38%). There is also a statistically significant association of SNHL with dyslipidemia and elevated body mass index (P < 0.001, [OR]: 4.118, 95% [CI]: 1.873–9.053 and P< 0.001, [OR]: 1.517, 95% [CI]: 1.237–1.859 ) with moderate and profound hearing loss. Conclusion: Based on the data obtained, it seems that the presence of major cardiovascular risk factors was a significant predictor for cochlear dysfunction.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed196    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded27    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal