Home Ahead of print Instructions Contacts
About us Current issue Submit article Advertise  
Editorial board Archives Subscribe Login   
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 62-65

Association of family history and consanguinity with permanent hearing impairment


1 Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Manipal College of Allied Health Science, Manipal University, Manipal, India
4 Mandke Hearing Services, Pune, India

Correspondence Address:
Heramba Ganapathy Selvarajan
Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai - 600 116, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-7749.113510

Rights and Permissions

Background: Risk factors for hearing impairment can offer important information for both the family and health-care providers regarding etiology, other associated health problems, and risk of recurrence in sub-sequent pregnancy. Family history and consanguinity indicates the possible involvement of genetic factors. Objective: The aim of the study is to find the strength of association of family history and consanguinity with permanent hearing impairment in infants. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed on 420 infants with permanent hearing impairment and normal hearing from the year 2008 to 2012. The case control ratio was 1:1. Alternate sampling method was used in a hospital for selecting the control group. Parent interview was carried out to collect the information of family history of hearing impairment and consanguineous marriage. Results: Family history and consanguinity was seen in 18.6% and 39.5% of the hearing-impaired group. These factors were associated with hearing impairment with a high significance (odds ratio (OR) 6.5; 95% Confidence interval (CI) 2.8, 15.1; P = 0.000 and OR: 2.7; 95% CI 1.9-3.9; P = 0.000). The combination of risk-factors is seen in 10% of the hearing-impaired group, whereas only 0.5% had it in the control group. Conclusion: Family history and consanguinity seems to be an important risk factor of hearing impairment both in isolation and in combination.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2229    
    Printed62    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded272    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal